General News

Compulsory military training

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Boys and men aged 12 to 26 years had to undertake compulsory military training from 1911. Twelve and thirteen year old boys were trained by their teachers at school. Training included 15 minutes of physical exercises per day, marching drill and at least one of miniature rifle shooting, first aid, swimming or mariner’s compass and elementary […]

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AT SCHOOL AT WAR – New!

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Bookings are coming in fast for our new AT SCHOOL AT WAR program. Designed for Stage 2, it is also available for Stage 3.  Dates have been extended. Now being offered from Term 1 Week 7. Check Calendar for available dates. Download At School At War flier for more details. 

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Red Cross workers of Coonamble Superior School with spinning wheel and knitted socks for the war effort. From Education Gazette January 1918

At School At War – NEW for Stage 2

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New for 2015 is our unique  At School At War program suitable for Stages 2 and 3 Step back to school in 1915 when NSW school pupils took an active role in the WW1 war effort: sending comfort packages and messages, fundraising for French and Belgian orphans, knitting, stitching, rolling and folding comfort and essential items. Based […]

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Ex-student Dorothy turns ninety

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Dorothy Kenning attended NRPS in the 1930s and was awarded Dux of the school in 1936. That year her teacher, the headmaster Mr Hamilton, taught her in one of the 1910 rooms. Dorothy walked to school through fields and orchards, her hair in plaits and carrying a leather satchel. A long-term resident of North Ryde, […]

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Thank you Bendigo Bank

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The Bendigo Bank, North Ryde Community Bank Branch, recently donated $1000 to the NSW Schoolhouse Museum. This donation helped pay for the reinstatement of the school lights in the 1910 classrooms. We thank them for their donation.

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School terms 1880s

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The school year was much longer in 1880. The Public Instruction Act of 1880 states that there were two ‘half-years’(semesters) with a two week mid-winter break and three weeks at Christmas. School grades were arranged differently to today with some grades extending over 18 months. The grades were 1st Class (three half-years), 2nd Class (three […]

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School days 1880s

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We had an email enquiry from 7 year old Mia who wondered if children used to go to school on Saturdays. In the 1880s the school days were Monday to Friday but the working week included Saturday. Sunday was a day of rest when many people would have attended church. From 1880 school was compulsory […]

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Wet day at school – teach flower arranging!

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We enjoy reading through the early NSW syllabuses in our collection as they show how schooling and society has changed. School flower, vegetable and agricultural plots were quite important in the past with whole sections of the syllabus providing detailed month-by-month instructions on plantings and maintenance. We loved this paragraph from the 1916 syllabus about […]

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Never too old for maypole dancing

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Each semester groups of UWS Master of Teaching students visit the Schoolhouse Museum to observe students participating in the Schoolhouse activities as part of their HSIE subject. It is always a pleasure to have these enthusiastic pre-service teachers. Our group last Monday was particularly engaged and enjoyed a jig around the maypole.

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Empire Day 24th May

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Australia’s first Empire Day was celebrated on 24th May, 1905. It reminded Australians that they were part of the British Empire, and proud to be. In schools children listened to speeches, acted out plays about the Empire, marched and cheered. A maypole dance was a common feature of Empire Day celebrations, as shown in this […]

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